Chapter 12 – Rumors, Truth & Lies: Page 11

Chapter 12 – Rumors, Truth  Lies - Page 11

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  • N

    It sounds good to me and I’m Spanish :|

  • N

    Bueno bueno, depende de quién y de cuando. Te pueden decir “¡Despierta!”, “¡Quieres despertarte de una vez!” y mil variaciones más, no se dice solo “despierta” cada vez que quieres que alguien se levante. Y por supuesto “Despiertate” se dice también, vamos a mi me han despertado así un montón de veces.

    Eso es como decir que siempre dices “come el bocata” y que tu madre nunca te ha dicho “comete el bocata”. No entro en que sea o no correcto, pero usarse se usan los dos.

    • loveispainpleasure

      Honestly, as a non-native learner of Spanish, I would never try to say someone’s translations don’t sound right. I don’t know if that’s the case with Laura, but sounds like it. Not me, but some learners get up on a high horse. I can’t even speak the language (just write and understand and read) so I wouldn’t say a thing about how good or bad someone’s Spanish is.

      • themice

        It is how my mom used to wake me, and she is from Ecuador. Possibly she could have been saying it Spanglishcized, but more likely it is a regional thing. Spelling errors, however, are all me.

        • loveispainpleasure

          Yeah, I note the difference between “natural” and “unnatural” acquisition of a language. I started learning Spanish from classes “unnaturally” when I was 12. My coworkers learned it “naturally” from their parents and aunts and uncles, grandparents…and so on. Therefore, even if I ever get the guts to speak it (I am 30 now so you can imagine the difficulty), it will never sound as comfortable as someone who learned naturally.

          Thanks for sharing about your mom. I like how you bring a bit of your life into this comic.

          I’m a half African-American, half white woman who gets mistaken for Puerto Rican quite often, living in area with a lot of Puerto Ricans. I hear Spanish at my job every day, and people speaking to me in Spanish automatically, which is painful and funny at the same time. The awkward is strong sometimes! I actually believe my desire to learn the language happened because people have been mistakenly speaking it to me ever since I was a very young child, and I wanted to understand.

          • themice

            Puerto Rican is the default thought for some people. I grew up in a Southern working class KKK town pretty much in the black ghetto. No Latinos at all. Lots of racial tension and strife but a lot of racists didn’t know what to think of me. We did get our house and car egged and yelled “GO HOME PUERTO RICANS!” We weren’t Puerto Ricans and I was born here!

            Probaby why I made Rafa’s ghetto mixed with lots of Latinos. It would be what I had wanted, poor AND accepted.

          • loveispainpleasure

            Thank you for sharing about your past. I had to live in an all white town and I was not accepted. I first experienced racism at age 7. No other people of color around besides my siblings and my dad for years.

            I’m actually flattered when Puerto Ricans think I am. Simply because it’s flattering to be thought of as belonging to someone’s group. That’s what some people do when they speak Spanish to me. I’m not offended or anything. But my Spanish is terrible.

            It makes sense. I have a lot of the same blood (European and African) so in a weird way it’s not SO far off. : )

  • Donald Burch

    Google translate ftw! On a more serious note, I’ve been in Elan’s position. I grew close once and had nightmares about losing him. It’s a horrible feeling.

    • themice

      I don’t get a lot of nightmares, and the ones I get are recurring (tornadoes). I had to rely on other people’s experiences.

      • Donald Burch

        I’m no expert. I can only speak of my personal experience but I learned that I had nightmares of loss because I grew up in a world where nothing was stable. We struggled to eat and my family was stalked by and sometimes beaten by our alcoholic father. When something or someone comes along to make life sweeter, there is this constant feeling of dread, like waiting for the other shoe to drop and take all the good away.